Spitting in Dogs Mouth: Is This Right?

I recently came across some videos where dog trainers are spitting in their dog’s mouths as a training method.

It was claimed that these are age-old methods passed down thousands of years ago by Native Americans, mainly as a way to calm a dog down.

Is there any truth in this act at all? What does it actually accomplish?

I personally do not believe in nor use this method, but in this post, I dig in a bit more about this strange practice.

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Spitting in dogs mouth

What does spitting in a dog’s mouth do? Claims by other dog owners

There is not a lot of literature about this topic online, but you can still find some on forums and the random website here and there.

The opinions below are what is claimed by others, and are not my personal opinion, which I will share in the ending section of this post.

Spitting in a dog’s mouth is a common practice since the days of our ancestors. It’s not just a way to get your dog to stop chewing on your shoe, but it’s also a way to show your dog that you’re in charge.

There are a few who claim that it is an effective method of assertive communication, and it can help you establish dominance when the two of you are playing or training.

When you spit into your dog’s mouth, you’re demonstrating that you’re willing to use aggression against them if they don’t obey your commands.

Dogs learn through repetition, so if they see that spitting isn’t punished by their owners taking action against them, then they will continue to act aggressively toward their masters.

Spitting into your dog’s mouth also gives them a reminder as to who is boss around the house!

Another common claim is that spitting in your dog’s mouth is a way to calm it down.

It is said that it simulates its mother comforting and protecting a dog.

These actions are hardly seen, heard, or used anywhere at all, so what gives?

How to calm a dog down?

If your intention is to learn how to calm your nervous dog, there are several proven techniques that are proven to work, and none of them includes the very disgusting act of spitting down your dog’s mouth.

Dogs like to be around people because it helps them feel safe.

This means that if your dog is anxious and not feeling safe, he or she will exhibit signs of anxiety.

You can tell if your dog is anxious by looking for the following signs:

  • Shaking
  • Yawning or panting
  • Drooling
  • Pacing
  • Panting
  • Licking lips or nose (this is also a sign of salivating)

If your dog exhibits any of these signs, it’s best to remove them from the situation immediately.

This may mean taking them outside, giving them something else to do (like chew on), or distracting them with toys or treats.

Here are some tips to help you calm your dog down:

  • Try petting your dog. This can be very soothing to your dog, and it’s a great way to distract him from whatever is making him anxious.
  • Talk softly and reassuringly to the dog. You can even try saying “Shhh…” or “It’s okay…”
  • Offer the dog some treats or his favorite toy if he seems very stressed out. This can be a great way to distract him from whatever is making him anxious and help him relax more quickly.

Positive reinforcement for training your dog

Here at Daily Dog Drama, we strongly believe in using positive reinforcement to train our dogs.

We treat them like our family, like our kids, and there is no way we will resort to any of the antiquated methods of establishing dominance over your dog.

Frequently, they include barbaric methods such as using the Alpha roll on your dog, kicking them in the rump or even euthanizing them when they don’t comply.

Seriously, how is this kind of behavior reasonable or acceptable at all? Would you do that to a fellow human? Would you spit on your kid?

Positive reinforcement is the best way to train your dog.

It’s simple: reward good behavior and ignore bad behavior. It’s what they want.

Dogs are hunters by nature, so they want to find things and bring them back to you!

When they do that, it’s a reward for them because they get praise and treats from you.

Dogs also like to play games, so if you can engage with them using toys or treats, then great!

You can teach them tricks or have fun playing fetch with a ball or frisbee.

In both cases, when the dog does what you want—whether it’s bringing a toy back or doing a trick—you reward them with praise and/or treats.

So any time your dog does something good, you should make sure they know it!

The same goes for when they do something bad: don’t punish your dog when they misbehave; just ignore it and move on with your day.

They’ll get the hint pretty quickly that doing those things isn’t going to get them anywhere!

Should you spit in your dog’s food?

Another group of people seems to suggest that spitting in your dog’s food can help you establish your position as the master.

I don’t really know what’s inside the heads of these people, but I suspect nothing more than dead grass.

This is not a reasonable or sensible act at all, and I bet your dog does not even care at all.

Not only is it disgusting but it seems likely to me that diseases can be passed around by doing so.

Please, stop doing this or stop thinking about this!

In conclusion: Spitting in dogs mouth or food

You should check out some of the videos on YouTube or read some of the comments on the forums to find out more.

I do not wish to link to them from here though.

Try to think if these actions are logical at all and whether there are better ways (hint: there are) to treat your dog.

Most of us pride ourselves as dog parents and we love our dogs just like our own family, so I ask you to really think carefully before engaging in such behavior.

Here is a pretty good article to learn more.

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Zack Keithy
Zack Keithy

Hi, I'm Zack, the Chief Editor here. I was formerly a certified vet tech for a good 6 years before moving on to greener pastures. Right now, I am still heavily involved in dog parenting duties, and it is my desire to share all our knowledge with fellow dog owners out there! Connect with me on LinkedIn or check out my about page!.

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